Dating gillette razors and blades

Some, called "comb razors," were made with a row of little teeth below the blade; the combs tend to leave a touch more shaving cream behind, which creates more glide.

Some were made in three parts, which the shaver took apart and re-assembled with every blade change — a system that yields a very stable device but it's fussy.

His razors quickly sold, he refurbished even more; they sold at even higher prices, and before he knew it Hickam had a new business on his hands.

dating gillette razors and blades-43dating gillette razors and blades-20dating gillette razors and blades-46

| To facilitate the process, Gillette and other razor manufacturers became experts at a kind of consumer shell game: As soon as customers became accustomed to a new model, and returned to stores to buy replacement blades, they discovered that their razor had just been discontinued in favor of a newer system.They are considered by many to be the apex of Gillette’s razor designs, yet in their day, they sold for a mere

| To facilitate the process, Gillette and other razor manufacturers became experts at a kind of consumer shell game: As soon as customers became accustomed to a new model, and returned to stores to buy replacement blades, they discovered that their razor had just been discontinued in favor of a newer system.

They are considered by many to be the apex of Gillette’s razor designs, yet in their day, they sold for a mere $1 apiece. " When he went looking for a machine shop to do it, he ran into a series of obstacles that taught him a lot about why razor designs, and manufacturing in general, have declined so dramatically in the U. Just for starters, he discovered that the engineering capabilities for making a sophisticated, double-edge razor are virtually extinct.

Today, these old razors have become so popular that some of the rarer models can sell for upwards of $400 after they've been shined up. The price of novelty In the 1970s, when Gillette moved into the more lucrative market of multi-blade cartridges and throw-away plastic razors, the company started selling off most of its manufacturing machinery for double-edge (called DE) shaving gear.

Following that is a chart explaining the coding system Gillette used from the beginning.

This is something rather nice that you can do with traditional, real shaving.

||

| To facilitate the process, Gillette and other razor manufacturers became experts at a kind of consumer shell game: As soon as customers became accustomed to a new model, and returned to stores to buy replacement blades, they discovered that their razor had just been discontinued in favor of a newer system.They are considered by many to be the apex of Gillette’s razor designs, yet in their day, they sold for a mere $1 apiece. " When he went looking for a machine shop to do it, he ran into a series of obstacles that taught him a lot about why razor designs, and manufacturing in general, have declined so dramatically in the U. Just for starters, he discovered that the engineering capabilities for making a sophisticated, double-edge razor are virtually extinct.Today, these old razors have become so popular that some of the rarer models can sell for upwards of $400 after they've been shined up. The price of novelty In the 1970s, when Gillette moved into the more lucrative market of multi-blade cartridges and throw-away plastic razors, the company started selling off most of its manufacturing machinery for double-edge (called DE) shaving gear.Following that is a chart explaining the coding system Gillette used from the beginning.This is something rather nice that you can do with traditional, real shaving.

apiece. " When he went looking for a machine shop to do it, he ran into a series of obstacles that taught him a lot about why razor designs, and manufacturing in general, have declined so dramatically in the U. Just for starters, he discovered that the engineering capabilities for making a sophisticated, double-edge razor are virtually extinct.Today, these old razors have become so popular that some of the rarer models can sell for upwards of 0 after they've been shined up. The price of novelty In the 1970s, when Gillette moved into the more lucrative market of multi-blade cartridges and throw-away plastic razors, the company started selling off most of its manufacturing machinery for double-edge (called DE) shaving gear.Following that is a chart explaining the coding system Gillette used from the beginning.This is something rather nice that you can do with traditional, real shaving.